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Cornerstone Family Chiropractic Center

Dr. Bernard Sirois

Dr. Michelle Sirois

 

504 North Washington Street
Salem, MO 65560

 

(573) 729-5321

Acupuncture

Acupuncture

Cornerstone Family Chiropractic Center offers two kinds of acupuncture — with needles and without needles (electroacupuncture).

Acupuncture is a way to relieve pain and inflammation. According to the mayoclinic.org, “Acupuncture involves the insertion of extremely thin needles through your skin at strategic points on your body.” Acupuncture is most commonly used for pain relief and is an important part of Traditional Chinese medicine.

 

 

 

Acupuncture Points

Acupuncture points, or “acupoints,” are specific locations on the body that are the focus of acupuncture treatments. TCM explains acupuncture as a technique for “balancing the flow of energy or life force,” and that energy can be reached by stimulating small specific channels on the body.

 

TCM practitioners believe that there is a flow, known as “qi” or “chi,” that is located in certain “meridians” throughout the body. Chi is thought to be what separates the sick from the healthy — and when chi is not balanced, illness, pain, poor sleep, and fatigue can all occur.

  •  There are 14 major energy-channel meridians on the body, with hundreds of points located along each meridian where acupuncture needles are inserted.

  • These include some 360 different points on the hands, arms, feet, head, back and over the major organs. The belief is that by inserting needles lightly into certain points on the body, the chi flow can be tapped into and the patient’s energy can be rebalanced.

  • Acupuncture points tend to be located where nerves enter a muscle, the midpoint of a muscle, or at a point where muscle joins with bone.

 

Some of the major acupuncture meridians include:

  • Lung Meridian

  • Large Intestine Meridian

  • Stomach Meridian

  • Spleen Meridian

  • Heart Meridian

  • Small Intestine Meridian

  • Urinary Bladder Meridian

  • Kidney Meridian

  • Liver Meridian

 

How Does Acupuncture Work?

Acupuncture is considered to be a family of procedures, not one single exact approach to pain or disease management. All acupuncture practices involve the stimulation of specific points on the body using a variety of techniques, usually needles. The type of acupuncture that has been studied most so far in clinical, scientific research settings is the type that uses thin, solid, metal needles to lightly puncture the skin.

 

Acupuncture is usually done by hand, with a trained practitioner carefully inserting the needles into specific points in the body very shallowly into the skin. Normally about 10 to 20 thin needles are used at one time. The needles are small enough to fit inside of a normal-sized needle that would be used to take blood, making the process pretty painless for most people.

There are also types of acupuncture that use light electrical stimulations that flow through the needles, or no needles at all. For example, acupressure is often thought of as simply “acupuncture without the needles” and uses targeted massage-type techniques to stimulate energy in the body by pressing on certain points.

 

 

What Will I Experience? 

An acupuncture session works something like this:

  • First, the acupuncturist will speak with the patient about their pain and health-related goals.

  • Then they will usually look at the patient’s tongue and press on their vital organs to see if there is anything noticeable contributing to an imbalance.

  • The acupuncturist will then use sterile, disposable small needles and will place them along specific “meridians” on the body.

  • The acupuncturist will check for “pulses” on the body by gently placing their fingers or hand on the patient’s body to feel how the patient’s energy is flowing. Redness can also occur around a needle site, and this is thought to be a sign that as energy is not balanced in that area.

  • The needles will usually stay in for a short period of time while the patent’s energy is reworking and balancing itself.

  • After the needles are removed, the patient can go about their day and are usually advised to drink plenty of water in an effort to help the detoxifying process.